Tag Archives: NEVADA TRUST

New French U.S. Tax Treaty Gives French Citizens Preferred Inheritance Tax Strategy

France is on the United States’ favorite country list.   Recently, France and the U.S. changed their tax treaty.   Under the new treaty,  the U.S. estate tax does not apply if the spouse inherits the property.   And it gets better.

The surviving French spouse can sell the property located in the U.S income tax-free.

This how it works.   When the spouse inherits the property, she or he has a new cost for tax purposes.   The cost is the market value at the time of the death.  For example, French couple acquired a home in Los Angeles in 2009 for U.S.$500,000.

The husband dies in 2017.   The house is now worth $1,500,000.   The wife inherits the home without.  The U.S. death tax does not apply because of the U.S. – French Tax Treaty.

Next, U.S income tax law increases the tax cost of inherited property to the market value as of the day of death.    When the spouse sells the property for $1,500,000 she will have no gain or loss.

This new tax law is found in a “protocol” to the original French-U.S. income tax treaty and not to the estate tax treaty.  Here is a link to the protocol.

If you need help with your U.S. – French tax planning, then please email me [email protected]

By the way, U.S. tax laws allow a unique type of trust that will avoid inheritance tax for the children of French citizens.   Wth trust is called a “marital deduction trust”.  This trust created at the time of the death of the first spouse.   For French tax law, this trust is a U.S. person which provides interesting tax savings.   By the way, the French have duplicated the U.S. foreign trust reporting (the U.S. trust is a French foreign trust).   As you know, I am a big fan of reporting.

As you know, I am a big fan of reporting.   In this case, the tax treaty provides powerful protection.  Best state for a French U.S. trust is Nevada.

 

 

Foreign Investors Learn Why a Foreign Corporation is U.S. Death Tax Trap

The problem for the non-resident alien is that their estate tax exemption is $60,000 and not $5.3 million (as it is for Americans).   And there is one more problem… the U.S. estate tax planner.  While the U.S. has a tax on the estate, other countries tax the recipient.  This tax is called an “inheritance tax.”

Thus the  American tax planner also must know “international inheritance tax planning” for the foreign country of the investor.

They advise the nonresident alien (the term for estate and gift taxes is “nondomiciled“) to own their U.S. investments and U.S. real estate through a foreign corporation (such as a Panamanian company or a British Virgin Island company).  

Since the 1950’s, this tax plan has failed.  The U.S. courts have ruled for the IRS (more on these cases on this link).  These court cases focused on the power to revoke (section 2038) and the right to the corporate dividends (section 2036).  These tax laws  required the assets owned by the foreign entity to be included in the deceased’s U.S. taxable estate

The best estate tax planning method for the foreign investor involves a trust.   Here is a link on the basics.  In Europe and the United Kingdom have an inheritance tax.  Estate taxes and inheritance differ.  This difference challenges international inheritance tax planners. 
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Tax Planning Tricks of Cross-Border Tax Accountants (CPAs)

Just how do cross-border tax accountants (usually a CPA or Chartered Accountant) use different nations tax laws to legally avoid taxes?

One term you will see on the internet is “hybrid” such as a hybrid company or a hybrid trust.

The USA is the biggest source of hybrid companies.   I am sure you have heard of them; they are known as limited liability company (LLC).    Only in America, the tax authorities (the IRS) treats the LLC as non-existing.  Yep, the single member LLC does not file a tax return.  It is completely invisible.

Meanwhile, Europe and even Mexico has complained to the U.S.  The Panama Papers disclosed that the Wymoing LLC is the most invisible tax haven company on the planet.   For example, if a French person owns a Wyoming LLC his government will never know.  Yet, this company can do worldwide cross-border business.  It can open U.S. and foreign bank accounts.

Hybrid Trusts are usually created in Nevada.  Cross-border accountants know that trusts only exist in form British colonies.  Yep, that includes America.   For reasons the baffle many, the U.S Department of the Treasury issued regulations that allow a Nevada trust to be taxed (in the U.S. and only the U.S) as a foreign trust.  Yep, it is as if the Nevada trust is in a  foreign (non-existing) country.

This allows the cross-border family to avoid inheritance tax in their home country and estate and income tax in the U.S.  Below is a fifteen minute audio of my radio show  (BlogTalk Radio Show; see just below my picture, above) on the Nevada Tax Haven Trust.

By the way, the corporate trustee fee is usually $2,500 per year.

Treasury Department Leads the Way in Saving Taxes and Protecting Assets with a Foreign Trust

saving taxes, how to save taxes, tax planning,

Saving taxes by requesting a private letter ruling from the IRS National Office.

At the end of last century, the Department of the Treasury led the way in making foreign trust attractive.  The IRS issued a legal memorandum providing the blueprint for protecting assets and saving taxes. 

Nevada  provides unique asset protection for these trusts.  A new IRS regulation allows the Nevada trust to be classified as a foreign trust. 

The tax advantage of a foreign trust is its classification as a “grantor trust.”  This tax plan uses a special asset protection section of the tax code, section 679.

Unlike a domestic trust, all assets transferred to a foreign trust are allowed “grantor trust” status (with one tax planning exception explained below).  They are also excluded from the taxable estate of the settlor.

As a “grantor trust,” the tax law allows the transfers of assets to the trust to be income tax-free.  Thus, you can do what you want to protect your assets and reduce estate taxes without worrying about income taxation.  

This IRS blueprint on foreign trust tax planning is the explained in this episode of my radio show, Tax Talk below.

The play time is about 22 minutes.  Or, If you would like to brainstorm your tax planning, then please call me, Brian Dooley CPA, at 949-939-3414 for a consultation.

If you want to defer income taxes, then fund the foreign trust with a loan due within five years.  Such a loan is called a “qualified obligation.”  This makes the trust a tax deferral vehicle.  The tax deferral can last for more than a century.  This type of a trust is named “non-grantor foreign trust.” 

The IRS Form 3520-A (filed by the trustee) details the tax planning structure for a tax-deferred foreign trust.  You will want to use the “qualified obligation” found on page 3 of the Form 3520 (filed by the settlor).   

Learn the basics on offshore trust on this short video.  Be an expert with my easy to read book, International Taxation in America, available at Amazon.

Five Best Tax Saving And Smart Planning Tips For Small Business Owners

No,  this is not another blog about lame tax ideas.   Big Business has many tips that are not known by most CPAs.   The best five tax planning tips are:
1.  Use more than one entity.  Have one use the accrual basis of account.   This allows you to avoid taxes on prepayments  (more on this link) and expense costs before they are paid.   Have one entity be a corporation.    Corporations can be taxed as a separate entity (which means they pay their own taxes) or a pass through (by election subChapter S of the tax code).

Each of these corporate taxation methods has a unique advantage.   For a start-up, the separate entity has the benefit of allowing you be late on paying income tax on the profits.  Thus, you have more money to invest in growth.

Have one corporation doing business in a tax-free state such as Nevada.

2.  If you have only part-time employees or no employees fund your business  with the little-known tax savings of a solo 401K plan  (more on this link).  This works only if you have no full-time employees.  Big businesses use the ESOP retirement plan.  It is a fantastic tool but most small business can not afford the annual compliance cost.

3.  If you make sales via your website, place your website on a server in a tax-free state (learn more here) Also, have the server and website owned by a corporation in the same state.  If your website sells a service or another intangible item, use a tax haven corporation to own the site.  The server needs to be in the same country as the corporation.

4.  Use an irrevocable non-grantor trust to own any passthrough entities.   Of course, have the trust in a tax-free state such as  Nevada.   A non-grantor trust has almost no audit risks.  This type of a trust files its own tax return (Form 1041) and pay its own taxes.  By moving income to this return, you have a lower “adjusted gross income.”

A lower adjusted gross income allows you larger itemized deductions and more tax credits.  It also reduces your chances of a tax audit.

5.  Don’t rely upon year-end planning.  It is a suckers move.  Usually, you end up spending money to be able for a deduction.  Big Business plans a year in advance and not a month before year end.  Each time they add a product or service, they think about tax planning.   The most effective tax planning looks at income and not expenses.

If you need help creating a strategic tax plan, then contact me, Brian Dooley, CPA, MBT at 949-939-3414.  A recent Government study showed that tax planning businesses are taxed at 14%.  For every one dollar spent in tax planning,  ten dollars are saved in taxes.